The New Jersey Public Recreational Bathing Facility Code, N.J.A.C. 8:26-1.1, et seq., (“Bathing Code”), has changed as of January 16, 2018 and all pools in community associations with three or more dwelling units will be impacted.

Some of these changes are minor and most community associations will have no difficulty adapting to them. Other changes will result in increased costs to pool vendors, which may be passed onto the association. A few of these new requirements will require substantial unexpected and unbudgeted costs to associations. There may even be some confusion regarding who is obligated to comply with the Bathing Code.

All New Jersey Community Associations Must Comply With the Bathing Code

One may think that the Public Recreational Bathing Code would not apply to private community association pools. However, community association swimming pools, wading pools, and hot tubs/spas are considered public recreational bathing facilities as long as they are used by three or more dwelling units. Even though the general public cannot use these facilities, they must be operated in compliance with the Bathing Code.

Continue Reading Recent Changes to New Jersey’s Public Recreational Bathing Facility Code Will Impact All Community Associations

A few weeks ago, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) granted conditional approval of the PennEast Pipeline. FERC is a federal agency which regulates gas pipelines and issued an order to allow PennEast to proceed forward with its project on January 19, 2018. This approval will allow PennEast to file complaints in the United States Federal Courts in New Jersey and Pennsylvania seeking to exercise the power of eminent domain to take property rights to install the pipeline.

Since this announcement, the most common question has been: what happens next?

Continue Reading The PennEast Pipeline: What Happens Next?

If you are a contractor or subcontractor in New Jersey who is involved in the construction or renovation of residential structures, you should be aware of the requirements for filing a construction lien on a residence.

This process is markedly different from the filing of a construction lien with regard to a commercial property. The process to file a residential construction lien is outlined within N.J.S.A. 2A:44A-21.

In a commercial construction setting, a construction lien only has to be filed with the county clerk within 90 days of the last date the contractor or vendor provided the materials and services. On the other hand, the process for filing a lien on a residential property is much more involved.

Continue Reading Filing a Residential Construction Lien in New Jersey

Consider a few scenarios:

  • An employee has been injured on the job and unexpectedly fails a post-accident drug test, testing positive for opioids. What do you do?
  • An employee comes into your office, closes the door, and confides in you that she is battling an addiction to opioids and needs help. What policies apply and laws come into play?
  • An employee is increasingly absent from work, appears drowsy and inattentive when he is working, and his performance is slipping. You’ve issued a few verbal disciplinary warnings and have decided it is time for the employee to go, but when you go to put the “pink slip” in the employee’s locker, you find a current prescription for pain killers prescribed to the employee. Do you fire him?
  • A candidate for employment submits an application, has impressive credentials, has relevant job experience and hits a home run at her interview. You make a conditional job offer subject to the candidate passing a comprehensive background check, which turns up a drug possession conviction. You raise the issue with the candidate, who discloses that she had a drug dependency addiction in the past but is clean now and still attending support group meetings to stay clean. Do you hire her?

These are just a few examples of how employers and the workplace can be affected by the opioid crisis. Just about everyone in this day and age has been touched by the opioid epidemic or knows someone who has. Employers similarly are not immune to this sad and sobering reality. The opioid crisis touches many employment law issues, policies and procedures, including background checks, drug testing, medical leave laws, employee benefits and counseling, social media and employee speech, employee privacy and HIPAA, and disability discrimination and accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Continue Reading Opioids, Employees, and Accommodations: an Employer’s Primer on Confronting the Crisis

*Updated February 6, 2018*

Carson Pirie Scott II, Inc., aka Bon-Ton Stores (“Bon-Ton”), which has dual headquarters in Milwaukee, WI and York, PA, filed on Super Bowl Sunday for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the US Bankruptcy Court, District of Delaware, Docket # 18-10248 (MFW).

The regional department store chain operates 260 stores in 24 states, largely in the Northeast and Midwest. Bon-Ton operates stores under its own name as well as: the Boston Store, Carson’s, Younkers, Herberger’s, and Elder-Beerman. Rumblings of a possible filing circulated in early December as the chain watched its holiday sales fall.

Bon-Ton reports that it has a commitment of $725 million for debtor-in-possession (“DIP”) financing to operate during the restructuring process. The company’s business plan, which was filed earlier this week with the SEC, reports it’s main priority is the overhaul of its private-label products, as it plays catch-up with Kohl’s, Macy’s, and J.C. Penney.

Continue Reading As Predicted, Bon-Ton Stores file for Chapter 11 Protection? First Large Retail Department Store Bankruptcy of 2018

With the recent news out of Washington that the Department of Labor has withdrawn Administrator’s Interpretation 2016-1 (its previous informal guidance on joint employment under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”)), and with the National Labor Relations Board pulling back the broad joint employer standard set in the 2015 Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc. case, many are under the impression that the joint employer storm has passed.

While these are certainly welcome developments, franchisors should be careful not to dismiss the threat of joint employer liability too quickly. This is particularly true if you have outlets located in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and/or West Virginia.

Continue Reading Joint Employer: Still a Potential Threat

2017 represented one of the busiest years for Chapter 11 retail bankruptcy filings. Many companies that filed have successfully emerged, like Payless. Yet, some are still questionable as to their future, such as Toys “R” Us, which is expected to begin selling a number of their leases and company owned real estate this quarter.

As the New Year begins, here are 10 retailers to watch for a possible Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing this year:

Continue Reading 10 Retailers to Watch for a Bankruptcy Filing in 2018

One of the questions that I am frequently asked is, “Who can develop property in a redevelopment area?”

As discussed below, redevelopment can be done by anyone, subject to restrictions discussed below, and is not necessarily restricted to just large scale developers.

A redeveloper is defined by New Jersey’s Local Housing and Redevelopment Law (the “LHRL”) as “… any person, firm, corporation, or public body that shall enter into or propose to enter into a contract with a municipality or other redevelopment entity for the redevelopment or rehabilitation of an area in need of redevelopment…”.

Thus, for a redeveloper to make use of the LHRL, a municipality must have first declared a property or properties as an area in need of redevelopment.

Continue Reading Who Can Be a Redeveloper of Property in New Jersey?

On December 11, 2017, Charming Charlie Holdings, Inc. (“Charming Charlie”), the Houston–based fashion jewelry and accessories chain filed a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Case in the United Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware. Charming Charlie has closed about 100 of its 360 stores. Further, its New York City flagship location on Fifth Avenue will soon close.

The company is working with turnaround advisor AlixPartners LLP, in addition to other restructuring advisors and attorneys.

More than 15 retailers, including Toys “R” Us Inc, the largest toy seller in the U.S., have filed for bankruptcy this year.

Continue Reading Charming Charlie’s the Next Retail Filing in 2017?