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Mr. Norris is an expert Civil Trial Attorney as certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey. Mr. Norris is also a member of the firm’s Litigation practice.

While most people who are appointed Powers of Attorney understand their general duty to act only within the best interests of the person for whom they are serving as a Power of Attorney, and to not undertake transactions which solely benefit themselves, most of them do not understand their duty to account which is required by statute. It is important that a Power of Attorney carefully account when utilizing a Power of Attorney to undertake financial transactions, as this issue could come back to bite them if they do not properly account.

Continue Reading The Duty to Account of a Power of Attorney

We live in a time where information flows freely, quickly, and openly to both individuals and companies alike. As a result, the availability of a criminal record search, or other similar search concerning an individual is easily obtained. In fact, a search can often be performed without the consent or authority of the person who is being searched. For these reasons, employers now typically require a mandatory background checks prior to hiring. As a result, many employers will not hire a prospective employee should they possess a criminal record of any nature.

Continue Reading Expungements Erasing Your Mistake

This is the second blog in a series of blogs examining the differences between New Jersey Lien Law and Pennsylvania Lien Law. Read part one discussing notice and timing differences here.

Since these states share a border, and many contractors operate in both states, they should be aware of the differences in the corresponding Lien Law Statutes. One key difference between the two states concerning the ability to file construction liens by a contractor is the writing requirement. Pennsylvania and New Jersey are on the polar opposites of the spectrum when it comes to the necessary writings to file a lien claim on a property.


Continue Reading New Jersey Lien Law vs. Pennsylvania Lien Law: The Writing Requirement