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We live in a time where information flows freely, quickly, and openly to both individuals and companies alike. As a result, the availability of a criminal record search, or other similar search concerning an individual is easily obtained. In fact, a search can often be performed without the consent or authority of the person who is being searched. For these reasons, employers now typically require a mandatory background checks prior to hiring. As a result, many employers will not hire a prospective employee should they possess a criminal record of any nature.

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In the process of probating and administering a Last Will and Testament of a Decedent, questions may arise whether assets owned by the Decedent are considered Estate assets or non-estate assets. This is called the distinction between probate and non-probate assets. It is important for determining Estate taxes to make this distinction.

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The general conception by most people is that a Last Will and Testament must be signed by the Decedent in the presence of two witnesses. While this is undoubtedly the preferred method for a Last Will and Testament to be executed, it is not the only way that a Will may be deemed validly executed by a Decedent.

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This is the second blog in a series of blogs examining the differences between New Jersey Lien Law and Pennsylvania Lien Law. Read part one discussing notice and timing differences here.

Since these states share a border, and many contractors operate in both states, they should be aware of the differences in the corresponding Lien Law Statutes. One key difference between the two states concerning the ability to file construction liens by a contractor is the writing requirement. Pennsylvania and New Jersey are on the polar opposites of the spectrum when it comes to the necessary writings to file a lien claim on a property.


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In the context of construction litigation, a question may arise whether a matter should be initiated in state court or federal court. Each Court might have jurisdiction to hear the matter under several different theories. Discussed below are the principal manners in which it is determined whether a state court or federal court has jurisdiction to hear a dispute.

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During a Will contest, a question may rise as to who is an interested party with regard to an estate. This question is not quite as simple as it may appear at first sight. In fact, the interested parties may be substantially greater than the party initiating the Will contest might have anticipated. As discussed below, interested parties are not merely those who are listed under the Last Will and Testament.

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