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Mr. Norris is an expert Civil Trial Attorney as certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey. Mr. Norris is also a member of the firm’s Litigation practice.

The purpose of this article is to discuss the general process for being appointed the guardian of a loved one or other family member. The process can be simple or complicated depending upon a multitude of factors. This article will discuss the general process; whereas future articles will explore issues that can arise which may render the process more complicated. It is important, however, to understand the general process of obtaining a guardianship before more complex issues can be explored.

Continue Reading How Do I Get a Guardianship

Last Will & TestamentUnder a Last Will and Testament, a decedent disposes of both their tangible personal property as well as their intangible personal property. Questions might arise in the context of administering an Estate, however, as to whether an item is classified as tangible personal property or intangible personal property of a decedent. This distinction is often important, as the distribution of an item of significant value can be directly affected by this determination.


Continue Reading Tangible vs. Intangible Assets in Estate Administration

Last Will & TestamentWhen considering whether to contest a decedent’s Last Will and Testament, an individual should consider whether red flags might be present which may point to a successful basis to challenge a disputed Will. The purpose of this article is to examine potential red flags which could highlight a potential issue with a Will which may lead to its invalidation. While this list is not exhaustive, these red flags tend to be the most frequently encountered issues concerning improperly drafted and/or executed Last Wills and Testaments.

Continue Reading Red Flags Indicating a Potentially Invalid Will

Once an individual is appointed an executor of an Estate, they are tasked with the proper and timely completion of the administration of the Estate, as well as the distribution of assets and property of the estate to its beneficiaries. Provided the executor understands his/her duty to the estate and seeks appropriate help in this process, the administration of an estate can be timely completed and assets appropriately distributed. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for issues to arise in the administration of an estate. The below sub-headings address scenarios where an executor could be removed by the Court once an application is filed by a beneficiary of an Estate. This is not an all-inclusive list, but instead, discusses some of the main issues that are typically encountered.
Continue Reading Removal of An Executor of An Estate

In the past, construction contracts could typically only be terminated if there was a breach of the construction agreement by the owner or contractor. Under such scenarios, litigation often arose concerning whether the termination was proper and whether the contractor might be entitled to lost profits and other damages as a result of the purported unlawful termination. This resulted in costly litigation for both an owner and a contractor if there were potential issues surrounding the termination. In the not-so-distant past, however, a new type of termination clause arose, which gained rapid traction in the industry. This was a “termination for convenience” clause.

Continue Reading Termination of Construction Contract for Convenience by Project Owner

In general, the party tasked with defending a decedent’s Will during a Will contest, which is typically the executor, is entitled to the reimbursement of counsel fees that they incur in defending the Will on behalf of the Estate. At times, however, a party who has filed an action to contest a Last Will and Testament may also be entitled to an award of counsel fees provided there was a reasonable and legitimate basis to contest the decedent’s Last Will and Testament. In a recent appellate division case, the court affirmed an award of counsel fees to the contestant of a decedent’s Will for these very reasons.

Continue Reading Counsel Fee Award When Contesting A Will

If you are the named executor of an Estate, there is the possibility that an action may be brought to challenge the validity of the Will which named you executor. Typically, this process begins with a verified complaint by an individual that seeks to contest the validity of the decedent’s Last Will and Testament submitted to the probate court. The statute of limitations for contesting a Will varies by state. For example, in New Jersey, it is merely four months for in-state residents and up to six months for out-of-state residents. Provided that a plaintiff (the person challenging the Will) has complied with the applicable state deadline by timely filing the Will contest, the executor should take several actions to prepare for defending against the Will contest.

Continue Reading Defending a Will Contest

In general, a party is only entitled to injunctive relief if they can demonstrate that the damages for which they seek redress are not compensable by an award of monetary damages, however, in a recent US District Court case, the US District Court decided that injunctive relief was called for to preserve monetary assets pending the resolution of a matter. Typically, it is rare to see estate litigation before a US District Court; however, the District Court correctly applied New Jersey law in finding that injunctive relief was appropriate.

Continue Reading Injunctive Relief to Prevent Monetary Damages in Estate Litigation

If you are a general contractor or subcontractor, you should know the New Jersey Prompt Payment Act. In general, the purpose of this Act is to encourage prompt payment to contractors for the materials and services they provide on a project by imposing potential sanctions, including counsel fees, should payments which are currently due not be timely and properly tendered. One of the provisions of this Act contains a fee-shifting provision whereby the contractor may be entitled to an award of all counsel fees incurred in seeking the payment it is due from a general contractor or subcontractor.
Continue Reading Counsel Fees Under the Prompt Payment Act

In previous blogs, I have discussed an award of counsel fees to a plaintiff who successfully contested a last will and testament. In a recent appellant division decision, the appellate court reviewed an award of counsel fees to a plaintiff who challenged a last will and testament, however, whose challenge was not successful.

Continue Reading Counsel Fees in Probate Litigation, Even if Unsuccessful