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On July 13, 2017, a new law was enacted in New Jersey amending the Planned Real Estate Development Full Disclosure Act (PREDFDA). While the new law was created in reaction to litigation involving a community called the Radburn Association, which lacked by-laws that mandated fair and open trustee elections, it also includes provisions relating to amendments of the by-laws which will apply to all community associations. Here is what you should know about these by-laws amendment provisions which are effective immediately:
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On July 13, 2017, a new law was enacted in New Jersey amending the Planned Real Estate Development Full Disclosure Act (PREDFDA). While primarily governing the development of community associations (homeowners associations, condominium associations, and co-ops) PREDFDA also has many requirements relating to their operation and governance. The new amendments to PREDFDA were created in reaction to litigation involving a community called the Radburn Association, which lacked by-laws that mandated fair and open trustee elections. However, the amendments will also apply to community associations which do have by-laws with seemingly-sufficient election procedures, and that may be a surprise to many community association board members and managers. A few of these important provisions which relate to board elections are summarized below.
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As drone technology advances and the number of drones in the air increases, managers and board members in community associations are asking about drone policies. If drones are being used in your community or if there is a plan for their use, whether recreational or commercial, your board should adopt a drone policy. drone in skyWhen

Community associations in New Jersey which have pet restrictions may need to permit a disabled resident to maintain an animal in his or her unit depending on needs. This rule could even apply to a visiting guest who is disabled.

Most people understand that the blind are entitled to use a guide dog wherever they go. However, there are other types of animals that also assist individuals with different types of disabilities and these also must be allowed despite any community pet restrictions. This could range from a monkey which performs tasks for a person with a spinal cord injury to a cat that provides emotional support to an individual with PTSD. Even if your association prohibits pets (or has weight or size restrictions for pets) they may be required to permit such animals for disabled residents or guests.


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The bylaws of most community associations permit members to vote “in person” or “by proxy.” Voting “in person” means just what it sounds like: a member attends a meeting and casts their vote while physically in attendance. But what does voting “by proxy” mean? Black’s Law Dictionary defines a “proxy” as the written authorization given by one person to another so that the second person can act for the first.

Thus, when a member of a community association votes by proxy, they give written authorization for another person to vote for them. It may be tempting to take short cuts in this process, but if your members are voting by proxy, they must actually execute a proper proxy.


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It is reasonable to think that owners of real property are responsible for maintaining and insuring that property. In community associations, however, the maintenance and insurance obligations are often not entirely consistent with ownership. Knowing the maintenance and insurance obligations for your community association and its unit owners is critical.

Ownership. Ascertaining who owns

As busy volunteers, often with full-time jobs, families, and other commitments, community association board members may not be able to attend all meetings of the board. When this happens, particularly when an important vote is pending and the trustees are divided on the issue, a board member may wonder if they can authorize another board member to act as their proxy at the meeting. Such a practice is impermissible and/or inadvisable under the law and most governing documents.
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While it was widely assumed to be so, a recent Ocean County trial court decision has held that claims under the Municipal Services Act are governed by the 6 year statute of limitations for contract claims. This means that a community association seeking past municipal services reimbursements may only be entitled to those which have accrued within the last 6 years. If your community association has not been receiving municipal services reimbursements or if you believe it has not been receiving all of the reimbursements for which it is entitled, you may have a limited time in which to formally pursue them.
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A recent trial court decision in Ocean County held that all roadways within a qualified private community – such as a homeowners association or condominium association – which provide access to units and function as roadways are eligible for reimbursement under the Municipal Services Act. This includes third tier roadways which municipalities have previously classified as “driveways”.
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