The recent unpublished (i.e., non-precedential) case of M.E.G. v. C.P. (link) shows how unpredictable family law matters can be. In the case, a child was born in June of 2016 in New Jersey. Under N.J.S.A., children may not be removed out of New Jersey without the consent of both parents unless a Court permits the removal. The parties were not married but planned to relocate from New Jersey to Florida after the child’s birth for a fresh start and financial stability. In November of 2017, the parties executed a relocation agreement which allowed the mother to relocate to Florida with the child and contemplated the father moving to Florida at a later time.

Continue Reading Considering a Relocation Agreement? Think Again!

Whether or not to vaccinate a child has been an issue for years that family law attorneys have addressed during divorce proceedings or in post-judgment cases (i.e., after a divorce). Clients often ask whether a Court has the authority to require a child to be vaccinated when one parent wants the child to be vaccinated and the other parent does not. This question has become even more relevant recently in light of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination being available to children ages 12 and older. A recent unpublished (i.e., non-precedential) Appellate Decision has shed some light on this issue. As is the case with most legal issues, the answer is “it depends.”


Continue Reading Can a Court Require Me to Get My Child Vaccinated?

You just realized an asset wasn’t included in the settlement agreement. Now what?

The custody schedule, support provisions, the sale of the marital home, and the agreement has been signed. This means at this point, the divorce is finalized. Just when everything seems they will return to a new normal you realize that an issue was forgotten and not addressed in the settlement agreement. So, what happens now?


Continue Reading Steps to Take When an Issue in a Divorce Settlement Is Overlooked

As Family Law attorneys, we are familiar with the importance of discretion—especially involving sensitive subject matters. We listen to very personal and/or sensitive information from clients regularly, it is part of our jobs. We fully understand that we owe a duty of confidentiality to all of our clients and take that very seriously.

However, this may be the first time you are looking for a divorce attorney. Most people find their divorce attorneys by either word of mouth referrals or online. If you searched for a divorce attorney on a shared computer, you might find yourself lying awake at night wondering if these ads may appear the next time your spouse is logged on. What does not have discretion or a duty of confidentiality is the software that allows the ads to appear online by remembering/recording your recent online searches. Here are a few simple steps you can take to prevent an unfortunate situation of your spouse seeing an ad for a divorce attorney or law firm while shopping online.


Continue Reading Tips for Searching For a Divorce Attorney Online Without Your Spouse Knowing

One of the most often asked questions about equitable distribution of marital assets is how a retirement asset is divided between spouses. The answer depends in large part on what type of retirement account is being divided, and what rules are associated with the retirement account.

All retirement accounts are not alike. The first question that must be asked is what type of retirement account are you dealing with? Generally, retirement plans are one of two types: a defined contribution plan, or a defined benefit plan.


Continue Reading Dividing Retirement Benefits in a Divorce

The past year has been difficult for many, and with deaths surpassing 400,000 in the United States due to COVID-19, many people in the midst of a divorce want to know what happens in the event their spouse becomes incapacitated, or worse, dies while a divorce is proceeding.

Continue Reading What Happens to My Divorce if My Spouse Passes Away or Is Incapacitated?

They say that the devil is in the details, and one of those details in a divorce is life insurance. Once all terms of an agreement are reached, the issue of life insurance has to be addressed. When cases do not settle, and a judge has to decide the issues of alimony and child support, the law governing support allows the judge to order life insurance to secure the obligation.

Continue Reading Life Insurance in a Divorce, Why You Need It and How Much You Need

Courts are asked to review electronic evidence more than ever, particularly in the age of the pandemic. You never know when or where the next video camera or recording device is going to show up. Particularly, when you’re in the middle of a contested divorce, if there are custody issues, caution is key. In addition to the obvious cell phone recordings, evidence in family law matters often comes from “nanny cams”, doorbell cameras, recordings of Zoom and FaceTime meetings, apps on cell phones to track locations, and other electronic marvels.

Continue Reading Videos, Recordings, and Other Electronic Evidence in Family Law Cases

With divorce rates spiking, some couples want to know their options for separating in 2020.

All relationships involve a degree of conflict—and it’s normal to argue more during stressful times. From worrying about your health and the health of your loved ones to facing increased financial uncertainty, all of the classic marital stressors have been amplified by the events of 2020.


Continue Reading Divorce Rates and COVID-19