This week, The Supreme Court of New Jersey delivered a monumental win for victims of sexual assault.

The Court’s unanimous decision in C.R. v M.T. set a new precedent for courts in deciding whether an alleged victim of sexual assault was too intoxicated to give consent—more specifically, the ruling clarifies the required burdens of proof in cases where the alleged victim seeks a restraining order under the Sexual Assault Survivor Protection Act of 2015 (SASPA).


Continue Reading Supreme Court of NJ Sets New Precedent on Sexual Consent and Intoxication

Back to school is here and even though the pandemic is still with us, many parents are thinking about travelling during the Thanksgiving and Winter Break periods. When the parents of children are not together, travel brings on some additional considerations. What should a parent consider when making plans to go out of state, or out of the country?

Continue Reading The Holidays Are Coming – What Divorced and Separated Parents Should Consider When Preparing for Travel During Pandemic

documents needed for divorce njBack to school season is a time when many people think about divorce. Whether you are simply looking for information or are ready to take the next steps in your life, chances are you are considering an initial meeting with a divorce lawyer to get information about your current situation. Many people want to know what type of information they need to have on hand to have a meaningful meeting with their lawyer. Understanding what type of information will be asked for and what will be necessary in a divorce case early on in the process can be helpful in a planning perspective. The following are documents that will almost always be necessary in a divorce situation.

Obtaining these documents during a contentious divorce can sometimes be difficult. Knowing what you may need ahead of time allows you to accumulate what you can in a less stressful environment, and one in which you are in control. It can also prevent documents from going missing. Sometimes a spouse can collect information around the house prior to announcing an intention to seek a divorce, or even consult with a lawyer. Taking pictures of documents can be helpful as well, such as checks from the other spouse in order to obtain account information.
Continue Reading What “Divorce Documents” Do I Need Before Filing for Divorce?

Alimony in New Jersey is subject to modification, suspension or even termination if an alimony payor can show that their former spouse is cohabitating.

What Is Cohabitation?

Most understand that alimony will cease if a former spouse receiving alimony gets remarried. Cohabitation, on the other hand, occurs when a divorced party doesn’t legally remarry, but chooses instead to enter  a mutually supportive and intimate personal relationship, which is normally associated with marriage.

Some of these cohabitating former spouses delay or forego marriage by design, knowing that their alimony will cease if they take the next step and remarry.

In order to counteract this possibility, the legislature in New Jersey has enacted a law which allows alimony payors to seek to have their alimony obligation decreased, suspended, or even terminated if they can prove that their former spouse is cohabitating.


Continue Reading Cohabitation in New Jersey: The Playing Field Leveled with Temple v. Temple

The recent unpublished (i.e., non-precedential) case of M.E.G. v. C.P. (link) shows how unpredictable family law matters can be. In the case, a child was born in June of 2016 in New Jersey. Under N.J.S.A., children may not be removed out of New Jersey without the consent of both parents unless a Court permits the removal. The parties were not married but planned to relocate from New Jersey to Florida after the child’s birth for a fresh start and financial stability. In November of 2017, the parties executed a relocation agreement which allowed the mother to relocate to Florida with the child and contemplated the father moving to Florida at a later time.

Continue Reading Considering a Relocation Agreement? Think Again!

Whether or not to vaccinate a child has been an issue for years that family law attorneys have addressed during divorce proceedings or in post-judgment cases (i.e., after a divorce). Clients often ask whether a Court has the authority to require a child to be vaccinated when one parent wants the child to be vaccinated and the other parent does not. This question has become even more relevant recently in light of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination being available to children ages 12 and older. A recent unpublished (i.e., non-precedential) Appellate Decision has shed some light on this issue. As is the case with most legal issues, the answer is “it depends.”


Continue Reading Can a Court Require Me to Get My Child Vaccinated?

You just realized an asset wasn’t included in the settlement agreement. Now what?

The custody schedule, support provisions, the sale of the marital home, and the agreement has been signed. This means at this point, the divorce is finalized. Just when everything seems they will return to a new normal you realize that an issue was forgotten and not addressed in the settlement agreement. So, what happens now?


Continue Reading Steps to Take When an Issue in a Divorce Settlement Is Overlooked

As Family Law attorneys, we are familiar with the importance of discretion—especially involving sensitive subject matters. We listen to very personal and/or sensitive information from clients regularly, it is part of our jobs. We fully understand that we owe a duty of confidentiality to all of our clients and take that very seriously.

However, this may be the first time you are looking for a divorce attorney. Most people find their divorce attorneys by either word of mouth referrals or online. If you searched for a divorce attorney on a shared computer, you might find yourself lying awake at night wondering if these ads may appear the next time your spouse is logged on. What does not have discretion or a duty of confidentiality is the software that allows the ads to appear online by remembering/recording your recent online searches. Here are a few simple steps you can take to prevent an unfortunate situation of your spouse seeing an ad for a divorce attorney or law firm while shopping online.


Continue Reading Tips for Searching For a Divorce Attorney Online Without Your Spouse Knowing

One of the most often asked questions about equitable distribution of marital assets is how a retirement asset is divided between spouses. The answer depends in large part on what type of retirement account is being divided, and what rules are associated with the retirement account.

All retirement accounts are not alike. The first question that must be asked is what type of retirement account are you dealing with? Generally, retirement plans are one of two types: a defined contribution plan, or a defined benefit plan.


Continue Reading Dividing Retirement Benefits in a Divorce

The past year has been difficult for many, and with deaths surpassing 400,000 in the United States due to COVID-19, many people in the midst of a divorce want to know what happens in the event their spouse becomes incapacitated, or worse, dies while a divorce is proceeding.

Continue Reading What Happens to My Divorce if My Spouse Passes Away or Is Incapacitated?