When a condo owner in arrears on assessments declares bankruptcy, a condo association often expresses concern about the effect of the bankruptcy on its ability to collect pre- and post-bankruptcy assessments.

The bankruptcy code states that fees or assessments that become due and payable after filing for bankruptcy protection are exempt from discharge. Any amounts owed prior to the filing the bankruptcy case are included in the discharge but may be reduced to liens against the property.

Under the New Jersey Condominium Act, NJSA 46:8B-21 (b), a condo association is entitled to a limited priority lien – over previously recorded liens (including mortgages) – for six months of “customary condominium assessments.” This statutory priority ensures that condo associations will be paid for some of the delinquent assessments instead of having their entire lien extinguished in foreclosure sales. Foreclosures often go hand in hand with bankruptcy.

Continue Reading Can a Condo Association Recover Past-Due Amounts After Owner Files Bankruptcy?

Benjamin Franklin once famously said that, “In this world nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes.” President Trump’s recent tax reform proposal is the administration’s attempt to alleviate one of these certainties of life.

President Trump’s proposal, which was released on Sept. 27, contained the following changes for individual taxpayers:

Continue Reading A Look at President Trump’s Tax Reform Proposal

In general, a contractor or supplier is entitled to file a lien against a commercial property if they have performed work or provided materials pursuant to a written contract with the owner. These lien claims must be filed within 90 days of the last date of providing materials or services for the project.

On the other hand, if a contractor or supplier is providing materials or services for a tenant of a commercial property, the rules are different. The differences as to what the lien may attach to are discussed in detail below.

Continue Reading Construction Liens on Leased Commercial Premises

The recently enacted Radburn statute changes how Community Association elections are conducted in New Jersey, impacting thousands of common interest communities. Community Associations in New Jersey must comply with the Radburn statute and potentially revise their voting systems and update their policies and procedures to comply with relevant law.

A key section in the Radburn statute provides that Community Associations shall not prevent electronic voting where the Community Association Board authorizes electronic voting and an Association member (or voting-eligible tenant) consents to voting electronically. Thus, while the Radburn statute allows electronic voting, implementing an electronic voting system requires the approval and authorization of the Association Board and the individual homeowner’s consent.

Continue Reading Should Your Community Association Be Concerned About Voter Fraud?

Upon the death a loved one, the Last Will and Testament governs how the liquid assets of an Estate are distributed. It is also common that the Last Will and Testament may provide instructions as the distribution of some of the personal property of the Decedent. Even under such circumstances, however, this often leaves a large amount of personal property which has to be divided among the living heirs. There are several different ways in which the remaining items of personal property of the Decedent can be distributed which is discussed below.

Continue Reading Division of Personal Property in an Estate

What is a “hostile work environment?”

This seemingly straightforward three-word phrase has vexed employers, in-house counsel, and HR professionals alike when dealing with employee internal grievances of discrimination and harassment. It’s easy to discipline employees engaged in repetitive discriminatory or harassing behavior in the workplace.

More troublesome for employers, however, is the single racial slur or isolated incident of harassment, which can leave HR directors in search of legal guidance.

Continue Reading Can One Workplace Incident Create a Hostile Work Environment?

Wayne, NJ-based Toys “R” Us filed a voluntary petition for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the Eastern District of Virginia (Richmond) on Monday (Case no. 17-34665). Toys “R” Us operates more than 1,600 locations for both Toy “R” Us and Babies “R” Us and employs approximately 64,000 people. The chain is seeking borrow money in order to pay suppliers by restructuring $5 billion in long-term debt. The company noted that the approaching holiday shopping season accounts for 40% of its net sales.

Prior to the filing, almost all the company’s vendors sought cash in advance before shipping products, forcing Toys “R” Us to raise $1 billion for suppliers. The company’s debt is attributed to a $6.6 billion buyout in 2005 led by KKR & Co. LP, Bain Capital LP and Vornado Realty Trust.

Continue Reading Toys “R” Us Files For Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection

Changing American Families

Changing social norms and biological advances in reproductive technology have changed the face of the family, in turn creating legal consequences and implications.

Families formed by non-traditional marriages, same-sex couples, and individuals intending to parent alone may use assisted reproductive technology. Assisted reproductive technology and adoption can help create families who may not be biologically related.

Continue Reading Tri-Parenting Arrangements and Custody

In the wake of Hurricane Harvey and the incredible devastation wrought across the State of Texas, many Americans want to do what they can to help. Unfortunately, there are some unscrupulous individuals who will seek to personally profit from the generosity of their neighbors.

The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that over $20 million was lost to charity scammers after Hurricane Katrina, and this disaster has the potential to cause just as much harm. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) have both issued warnings about fake charity scams that are emerging, and are urging Americans to only reach out to recognized charitable organizations.

Continue Reading Avoiding Charity Scams in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey